[ Read Online Dust Ð planets PDF ] by Arthur Slade · g-couture.co.uk

[ Read Online Dust Ð planets PDF ] by Arthur Slade · A science fiction story with a slow buildup of the bizarre, reminding me of some of William Sleator s books It would make a great movie The story of a young boy whose little brother goes missing.
I liked Arthur Slade s Hunchback Assignments series He s got a great way of building a world around his characters In this book, we are taken back to early 1900s Saskatchewan to a small farm community that is struggling with the drought conditions of the Dust bowl era A stranger comes to town and promises a way to make rain using his rainmill and all who help him build it will be rewarded with all the rain they need for their crops.
Robert suspects something fishy about this guy and when the adults actually start forgetting about his missing brother, and then children turn up missing, Robert realizes he is the only one who can do anything about it.
It took me 15 years to find this book again What follows is part review, part rambling on why books like Dust are important for children to read.
I read this some time in the early 2000 s when I was in school, and the imagery and story of it stuck with me ever since but it took me all this time to find it again Have you ever been tortured by a name, or movie, or book, of something that you once knew but can no longer remember That has been this book for me, for over a decade All I could remember was the stunning green jacket with the creepy man s face and the butterfly, and the haunting story of a little boy who goes missing in dirty thirties recession era Saskatchewan where I grew up , and the images of butterflies in a house.
Countless failed attempts at Google searches turned up nothing Then, just a couple nights ago, I was reading another book and, out of nowhere, decided to make another attempt at finding this lost relic And there it showed up on my screen, just like it had been there all along Dust, by Arthur Slade Elation, euphoria, and of course, butterflies Dust is the kind of book I think should be read in schools as part of a curriculum It s short, at just over 200 pages It s easy to read, but some words and phrases are complex enough to still teach kids new things And the story is captivating magic, fantasy, realism, even death and religion There are important lessons in this book, the least of which being that a child should never accept a ride from a stranger In my life, only two childhood stories have stuck with me in such a way that they ve continuously held a place in my conscience The first, Harry Potter series The second, Dust Here is an adult story brilliantly disguised as a children s story It talks about kidnapping, it talks about manipulation, even murder It talks about family life, religion, death, despair, poverty It doesn t shy away from real shit, and to me, that is soooo important in our children s books All that sugar coated crap, or the belief that certain books shouldn t be in school libraries, or ought to be banned all that is for parents who obviously don t want the best for their children Do I make this book sound appealing to kids with my talk of all this dark stuff Maybe not Have I offended you Maybe And if that s how you feel, that s okay, you have a right as a parent to monitor and filter what your child reads But don t be surprised when they are inevitably faced with, and can t deal with, the realities of life because you censored them from it from early on I hold the belief that if you re a child and the school system or a parent says you can t read a book, go read it in secret I won t tell There are plenty of public libraries out there for you where books are free Learn about life through fiction, you ll be better off for it.
Anyway, my sermon is over All that aside, this book is just fun and entertaining Even Kenneth Oppel, legend that he is, gave his stamp of approval and if a man who made the lives of bats interesting says a book is good, I ll believe him If you don t like the book for the book, you ve gotta love it for that jacket art it has literally haunted me for over a decade So stunning Pick it up, read it in a day, come to your own conclusions But books like these are important and necessary Hell, if a book sticks in your mind for nearly two decades, it ought to have done something right, no Onward.
Like Ray Bradbury, with language a bit straightforward, less flowery Horror, inspired by old school science fiction, hero is 11 12 but the book is really for 12 and up, too complex for most tweens Don t read it too fast, like I did I m afraid that I didn t settle in and immerse myself and so I ll forget too much and there are depths worth remembering Remember the Reverend Gibbs who died, supposedly of epilepsy and a bad ticker Remember Edmund s warning through the mirror Remember that Uncle Alden had books than the school library Remember how Saskatchewan reads like Oklahoma Remember that some people are born without souls.
Recommended to fans of Bradbury, of horror, of creative paranormal fantasy, of literate fables.
A science fiction story with a slow buildup of the bizarre, reminding me of some of William Sleator s books It would make a great movie The story of a young boy whose little brother goes missing.
I liked Arthur Slade s Hunchback Assignments series He s got a great way of building a world around his characters In this book, we are taken back to early 1900s Saskatchewan to a small farm community that is struggling with the drought conditions of the Dust bowl era A stranger comes to town and promises a way to make rain using his rainmill and all who help him build it will be rewarded with all the rain they need for their crops.
Robert suspects something fishy about this guy and when the adults actually start forgetting about his missing brother, and then children turn up missing, Robert realizes he is the only one who can do anything about it.
It took me 15 years to find this book again What follows is part review, part rambling on why books like Dust are important for children to read.
I read this some time in the early 2000 s when I was in school, and the imagery and story of it stuck with me ever since but it took me all this time to find it again Have you ever been tortured by a name, or movie, or book, of something that you once knew but can no longer remember That has been this book for me, for over a decade All I could remember was the stunning green jacket with the creepy man s face and the butterfly, and the haunting story of a little boy who goes missing in dirty thirties recession era Saskatchewan where I grew up , and the images of butterflies in a house.
Countless failed attempts at Google searches turned up nothing Then, just a couple nights ago, I was reading another book and, out of nowhere, decided to make another attempt at finding this lost relic And there it showed up on my screen, just like it had been there all along Dust, by Arthur Slade Elation, euphoria, and of course, butterflies Dust is the kind of book I think should be read in schools as part of a curriculum It s short, at just over 200 pages It s easy to read, but some words and phrases are complex enough to still teach kids new things And the story is captivating magic, fantasy, realism, even death and religion There are important lessons in this book, the least of which being that a child should never accept a ride from a stranger In my life, only two childhood stories have stuck with me in such a way that they ve continuously held a place in my conscience The first, Harry Potter series The second, Dust Here is an adult story brilliantly disguised as a children s story It talks about kidnapping, it talks about manipulation, even murder It talks about family life, religion, death, despair, poverty It doesn t shy away from real shit, and to me, that is soooo important in our children s books All that sugar coated crap, or the belief that certain books shouldn t be in school libraries, or ought to be banned all that is for parents who obviously don t want the best for their children Do I make this book sound appealing to kids with my talk of all this dark stuff Maybe not Have I offended you Maybe And if that s how you feel, that s okay, you have a right as a parent to monitor and filter what your child reads But don t be surprised when they are inevitably faced with, and can t deal with, the realities of life because you censored them from it from early on I hold the belief that if you re a child and the school system or a parent says you can t read a book, go read it in secret I won t tell There are plenty of public libraries out there for you where books are free Learn about life through fiction, you ll be better off for it.
Anyway, my sermon is over All that aside, this book is just fun and entertaining Even Kenneth Oppel, legend that he is, gave his stamp of approval and if a man who made the lives of bats interesting says a book is good, I ll believe him If you don t like the book for the book, you ve gotta love it for that jacket art it has literally haunted me for over a decade So stunning Pick it up, read it in a day, come to your own conclusions But books like these are important and necessary Hell, if a book sticks in your mind for nearly two decades, it ought to have done something right, no Onward.
Like Ray Bradbury, with language a bit straightforward, less flowery Horror, inspired by old school science fiction, hero is 11 12 but the book is really for 12 and up, too complex for most tweens Don t read it too fast, like I did I m afraid that I didn t settle in and immerse myself and so I ll forget too much and there are depths worth remembering Remember the Reverend Gibbs who died, supposedly of epilepsy and a bad ticker Remember Edmund s warning through the mirror Remember that Uncle Alden had books than the school library Remember how Saskatchewan reads like Oklahoma Remember that some people are born without souls.
Recommended to fans of Bradbury, of horror, of creative paranormal fantasy, of literate fables.
I ve had this on audible for a long while I can t remember, but I think I had received this free from the author a long while back, but hadn t gotten to it until recently as I hadn t much been for audiobooks until this year Anyhow, this was a short listen or read if you own the book I enjoyed the creepiness and mystery It s set back in the 1900 s when a drought hit a Dust town Robert s brother Matthew who s seven goes missing and Robert is set out to find him Problem is, things are turning strange in the town after a strange man, Abram appears in town More kids start to go missing and the people seem not to remember things or be concerned like normal people would, including Robert s parents who seem to dismiss Matthew s disappearance.
While everyone seems hypnotized by Abram and the rain making machine, Robert keeps his wits and is determined to find out what s happening to the town and what happened to Matthew.
I found this book pretty interesting and felt drawn to the story I was also happy with the ending.
It s the Great Depression in a prairie town in Saskatchewan A young boy named Matthew disappears Robert, the older brother is plagued with guilt A stranger comes to their town which is suffering through a serious dry spell This stranger claims he can help by building a rainmill huh The town believes him double huh All, except Robert and his uncle Soon, children disappear and the town doesn t seem to notice or care Adults and children soon forget about the missing All, except Robert Why Robert is immune to the stranger s power is never explained.
His classmates and he begin to have dreams of magical butterflies oohscary which adds nothing to the story Near the end, new characters called the Traders are added to the mix This made for a rushed ending While the author has a way with words and sets up nice descriptions, the story line was too weird Was this horror, mystery, supernatural I got this for free through Pixel of Ink so, it didn t cost me anything It is a short story at under 200 pages, was a quick read and had good reviews on This means it just might not be my cup of tea But, for me it was a really bad episode of The Twilight Zone.
Winner of the 15,000 Governor General s Award Winner of the Mr Christie s Award An American Library Association Best books for Young Adults Nominated for an Edgar Award Mystery Writers of America Over 60,000 copies soldFor fans of Stephen King and Ray BradburyImagine a depression era town where it hasn t rained for years A pale rainmaker with other worldly eyes brings rain to the countryside and mesmerizes the townspeople, but the children begin to disappear one by one Only young Robert Steelgate is able to resist the rainmaker s spell and begin the struggle to discover what has happened to his missing brother and the other children read the riveting first chapter of Dust and you re already past the point of no return Arthur Slade writes with the art and grace of a hypnotist, and you won t be able to put this book down It s sensational Kenneth Oppel, New York Times bestselling author of AIRBORN and SKYBREAKER.
About the Author Arthur Slade was raised on a ranch in the Cypress Hills of southwest Saskatchewan and began writing at an early age He has been writing fiction full time for fifteen years and is the author of sixteen bestselling books, including the Northern Frights series, Jolted, and The Hunchback Assignments He lives in the magical city of Saskatoon, Canada.
4.
0 StarsCreepy and unsettling, this is one of those stories that is so hard to classify by genre Whether you call it magical realism, historical suspense or a piece of light horror, this book is fantastic Despite the length and age of the main character, this book is written for all ages, not simply young adults Slade is a skilled writer with well developed characters Set during the Great Depression era, the Canadian prairie drought was vividly described, becoming another character in the story I highly recommend this unique and memorable story to a wide range of readers.
Found this book at work after having read it in middle school and not being able to remember who wrote it to find it again for years.
I still like it, it mostly held up My only complaint would be that once we got to the huge climax moment things suddenly seemed rushed and not explained well enough to picture it Which is weird because the rest of the book has a very relaxed pace Dust by Arthur Slade Set in a dry, Dusty Canadian town during the Depression Era, young Robert Steelgate is missing his young brother Matthew Yet the disturbing thing is that he seems to be the only person missing him A stranger comes to town promising rain and that is the same time kids start disappearing Coincidence, or not This book was like a really good episode of The Twilight Zone Things start off so plain, so dried out, so matter of fact Then young Matthew, who insisted he be allowed to walk to town that day instead of riding in the cart with his mom , meets a pale stranger Abram Harisch on the road Meanwhile, Robert is left at home to read his science fiction story The Warlock of Mars that his uncle lent him Reluctantly, Robert sets his book aside to see to the chickens like he promised only to find some scared chickens and some nasty blood eggs Yuck That s when Sargent Ramson and Officer Davies show up to take Robert to town to be with his family as they begin the search for Matthew.
With a blend of historical fiction, mystery, and science fiction, the author spins a tale of a town hoping too hard for good rains, of good people willing to let their memories of lost children slip from them, and of how one boy with a strong, questioning imagination may be the only one to save them Quite frankly, it was those scared chickens and their blood eggs that sucked me into the story It was spooky and yet the biologist in me wanted an egg to examine But I couldn t have one of those eggs, but I could examine this story From there, I wasn t disappointed.
Abram with the odd eyes I think he s an albino sets up a movie screen and the town gathers to see the attraction Once the stranger has gained some small amount of trust with the town, he starts setting in his motion his bigger plan promise the rains happiness, take their wealth memories, keep his end of the bargain with an unknown entity which means children disappear At one point, Abram confides a bit in Robert because Robert has this innate ability to see through Abram s charms That was an eerie scene The ending reveals the master plan of Abram while also keeping some things up to the reader to decide I liked that there was a little mystery left over at the end We have everything resolved that counts, but the exact how and why of it may never be fully understood Also, there is some wonderful imagery involving butterflies and moths It s a recurring small touch that kept me hooked I was quite pleased with the ending Not everything ended in rainbows but enough did for me to say it was a happy ending for our main character, Robert.
I received a copy of this book at no cost from the author with no strings attached.
Narration Arthur Slade was pretty good as a narrator for this story He had distinct voices for each person and decent female voices I especially liked his voice for Robert s uncle who was always giving him SFF books that his mom might not approve of.


It s the Great Depression in a prairie town in Saskatchewan A young boy named Matthew disappears Robert, the older brother is plagued with guilt A stranger comes to their town which is suffering through a serious dry spell This stranger claims he can help by building a rainmill huh The town believes him double huh All, except Robert and his uncle Soon, children disappear and the town doesn t seem to notice or care Adults and children soon forget about the missing All, except Robert Why Robert is immune to the stranger s power is never explained.
His classmates and he begin to have dreams of magical butterflies oohscary which adds nothing to the story Near the end, new characters called the Traders are added to the mix This made for a rushed ending While the author has a way with words and sets up nice descriptions, the story line was too weird Was this horror, mystery, supernatural I got this for free through Pixel of Ink so, it didn t cost me anything It is a short story at under 200 pages, was a quick read and had good reviews on This means it just might not be my cup of tea But, for me it was a really bad episode of The Twilight Zone.
I ve had this on audible for a long while I can t remember, but I think I had received this free from the author a long while back, but hadn t gotten to it until recently as I hadn t much been for audiobooks until this year Anyhow, this was a short listen or read if you own the book I enjoyed the creepiness and mystery It s set back in the 1900 s when a drought hit a Dust town Robert s brother Matthew who s seven goes missing and Robert is set out to find him Problem is, things are turning strange in the town after a strange man, Abram appears in town More kids start to go missing and the people seem not to remember things or be concerned like normal people would, including Robert s parents who seem to dismiss Matthew s disappearance.
While everyone seems hypnotized by Abram and the rain making machine, Robert keeps his wits and is determined to find out what s happening to the town and what happened to Matthew.
I found this book pretty interesting and felt drawn to the story I was also happy with the ending.
4.
0 StarsCreepy and unsettling, this is one of those stories that is so hard to classify by genre Whether you call it magical realism, historical suspense or a piece of light horror, this book is fantastic Despite the length and age of the main character, this book is written for all ages, not simply young adults Slade is a skilled writer with well developed characters Set during the Great Depression era, the Canadian prairie drought was vividly described, becoming another character in the story I highly recommend this unique and memorable story to a wide range of readers.
Found this book at work after having read it in middle school and not being able to remember who wrote it to find it again for years.
I still like it, it mostly held up My only complaint would be that once we got to the huge climax moment things suddenly seemed rushed and not explained well enough to picture it Which is weird because the rest of the book has a very relaxed pace Dust by Arthur Slade Set in a dry, Dusty Canadian town during the Depression Era, young Robert Steelgate is missing his young brother Matthew Yet the disturbing thing is that he seems to be the only person missing him A stranger comes to town promising rain and that is the same time kids start disappearing Coincidence, or not This book was like a really good episode of The Twilight Zone Things start off so plain, so dried out, so matter of fact Then young Matthew, who insisted he be allowed to walk to town that day instead of riding in the cart with his mom , meets a pale stranger Abram Harisch on the road Meanwhile, Robert is left at home to read his science fiction story The Warlock of Mars that his uncle lent him Reluctantly, Robert sets his book aside to see to the chickens like he promised only to find some scared chickens and some nasty blood eggs Yuck That s when Sargent Ramson and Officer Davies show up to take Robert to town to be with his family as they begin the search for Matthew.
With a blend of historical fiction, mystery, and science fiction, the author spins a tale of a town hoping too hard for good rains, of good people willing to let their memories of lost children slip from them, and of how one boy with a strong, questioning imagination may be the only one to save them Quite frankly, it was those scared chickens and their blood eggs that sucked me into the story It was spooky and yet the biologist in me wanted an egg to examine But I couldn t have one of those eggs, but I could examine this story From there, I wasn t disappointed.
Abram with the odd eyes I think he s an albino sets up a movie screen and the town gathers to see the attraction Once the stranger has gained some small amount of trust with the town, he starts setting in his motion his bigger plan promise the rains happiness, take their wealth memories, keep his end of the bargain with an unknown entity which means children disappear At one point, Abram confides a bit in Robert because Robert has this innate ability to see through Abram s charms That was an eerie scene The ending reveals the master plan of Abram while also keeping some things up to the reader to decide I liked that there was a little mystery left over at the end We have everything resolved that counts, but the exact how and why of it may never be fully understood Also, there is some wonderful imagery involving butterflies and moths It s a recurring small touch that kept me hooked I was quite pleased with the ending Not everything ended in rainbows but enough did for me to say it was a happy ending for our main character, Robert.
I received a copy of this book at no cost from the author with no strings attached.
Narration Arthur Slade was pretty good as a narrator for this story He had distinct voices for each person and decent female voices I especially liked his voice for Robert s uncle who was always giving him SFF books that his mom might not approve of.